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Independent Scholar, Academic Writing Coach

Since even before becoming a Bahá’í during college, I have been interested in how cultures might evolve towards higher spiritual goals. In pursuit of that interest, I have studied how immigrant mothers have used the knowledge gained in their passage from one country to another to create new forms of spiritual education for their children (for my PhD at UCLA in psychocultural anthropology); how Baha’i communities of Panamanian-indigenous Ngäbe people, inspired by Baha’u’llah’s revelation, challenge and transform gender and racial roles; and how intellectual and cultural trends pulse through revolutions (AB at Princeton University). I am currently exploring whether the insights generated through psychocultural anthropology can help us better understand the revelation of Bahá’u’lláh.

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