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Accelerating the Process of World Peace

Feb 1, 2022

Course: World Peace: The Bahá’í Perspective (2021)
Faculty Mentor: Dan Wheatley

Basil Shaw’s Learning Self-Assessment

I have achieved my primary aim about improving my ability to engage in discourse on the subject of Peace. 

The course World Peace: The Bahá’í Perspective has given me greater insight on the role of religion in the peace process, especially the role that certitude and conviction play in the development of morals and ethics. I now have a better understanding of the role of the Faith in the peace process. I think of the Faith as a catalyst accelerating the process of world peace.    

Although I need to develop my skills in discourse, I have become more humble when I talk about the Bahá’í perspective on peace and have a more inclusive approach to the subject. There is no more “us and them”! 

As a result of this course, I plan to take a more active approach to engage in meaningful discussions with my friends and associates. I am the contact person in my community for the secondary and senior schools. The Norwegian Bahá’í community has developed a very good internet site for these schools, addressed to the religion teachers. The knowledge I have gained here will definitely help me to present the Faith, when and if I am invited to give a lecture at the schools. 

Contributors

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Basil Shaw, Tunsberg, Norway

Born in New Westminster, B.C. Canada, 19 June 1944. Canadian Naval Officer 1964-1975. Became a Baha'i in 1976 Oak Bay, B.C. Canada. I have had a cursory contact with First Nations people while growing up on the west coast of Canada by travelling extensively throughout the BC coast; but, not until I had the humbling experience of observing the Fire Circle that was held after the Anchorage Conference in 1976 did I get a glimpse of the wonderful spirit of our Native American brothers and sisters. I pioneered to Norway in 1976, am married and currently residing in Norway. Lived 6 years in "Nordkalotten", the arctic area of Scandinavia which includes Norway, Sweden, and Finland. The indigenous peoples of this area are called Sami, as they prefer to called. (They have been known as "Laps" in many English references.) Worked as a carpenter and later as a Milieux-therapist (working with youth in a psychiatric ward 15 years) and in child protection agency as foster home counsellor. Retired at 77.

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